Most mentioned this week

The death of political writer and renowned athiest Christopher Hitchens received considerable media coverage over the weekend, with two of Hitchens’ books–his memoir Hitch-22 (A&U) and a collection of his most controversial writings, Arguably (A&U)–appearing in this week’s most mentioned chart. Also receiving several mentions were Michael Lewis’ analysis of Europe’s credit crisis, Boomerang: The Meltdown Tour (Penguin), Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad (Corsair) and Walter Isaacson’s Steve Jobs (Little, Brown)–Media Extra.

Most mentioned this week

Anna Funder’s Stasiland was a massive hit when it was released several years ago, so it’s no surprise that her debut novel All That I Am (Hamish Hamilton) is generating huge interest. Two years after Hitler came to power in Germany, the bodies of Dora and her friend Mathilde, prominent anti-Hitler activists in exile, lie poisoned in a flat in Bloomsbury. In Lynda La Plante’s Blood Line (S&S), Anna is given her first case and she has to figure out if it is a full-blown murder investigation or purely a missing person’s case. Arguably (A&U) is Christopher Hitchens’ collection of essays looking at Afghanistan, Iran and totalitarianism, and back to the American Revolution and Founding Fathers. Paul French’s Midnight in Peking (Viking) is set in January 1937. The city is a mix of privilege and scandal, lavish cocktail bars and opium debs, warlords and corruption, rumours and superstition–and the clock is ticking down to find a killer. Marieke Hardy’s You’ll Be Sorry When I’m Dead (A&U) was also featured on the most mentioned chartMedia Extra.

Most mentioned this week

Political writer Christopher Hitchens, author of God Is Not Great, has written a memoir entitled Hitch-22 (A&U), which has gained top place in our most mentioned chart this week. In his book Hitchens speaks about his opposition to the Vietnam War and how, after the September 11 attacks, he became an advocate of the war in Iraq. Next on the most mentioned chart is Laura Munson’s This Is Not the Story You Think It Is (HarperCollins). When Munson’s husband of 20 years proclaimed not to be in love with her anymore she wrote an essay about the experience and the unlikely happiness she found in refusing to let him leave her; This Is Not the Story You Think It Is is based on her original essay. Maggie O’Farrell’s The Hand That First Held Mine (Headline Review) and Colm Toibin’s Brooklyn (Picador) also gained a place on our most mentioned chart this week, along with James Shapiro’s Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare? (Faber) on the authenticity of Shakespeare’s work—Media Extra.

Most mentioned books this week

After a couple of weeks of media coverage, Susan Maushart’s The Winter of Our Disconnect (Bantam) has reached the most mentioned spot on our chart. Her book tells the story of the exile from the information age she imposed on her family. After the awful shock of a gadget-less life, the result was that the family communicated more when they had fewer gadgets with which to communicate (see our interview with Maushart here). Also appearing on the chart this week were Christopher Hitchens’s Hitch 22 (A&U), Colm Toibin’s Brooklyn (Picador), Walter Mosley’s Known to Evil (W&N) and Yoko Ogawa’s Hotel Iris (Harvill Secker)—Media Extra.